Why are women’s clothes more expensive than men’s?

“Fashion is a language that creates itself in clothes to interpret reality.”
Karl Lagerfeld

Some – such as fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld – view fashion as an art form, a mode of communication, a way of life.

In Britain, women spend average of £28,350 ($35,400) on clothing compared to men’s spend of £16,200 ($20,230). Average spends on shoes are likewise are £8,100 ($10,100) for women, £4,725 ($5,900) for men.

There is a variety of reasons for this disparity. Women’s clothes are generally more expensive, and women buy more clothes. But why?

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What is the most efficient way to shop?

I’m a big believer in having goals, and having plans to reach those goals.

But there are also times when sticking to a plan too rigidly can actually cost you money, time, or other opportunities.

Menu planning can be a bit like this. Having a plan is great – if I go grocery shopping when I’m hungry, and I don’t have a plan, I tend to buy whatever looks quick, easy and appealing – regardless of its cost or nutritional content!

But if you want next-level savings, it’s crucial to adapt your plans on the fly – and even to go shopping without a plan at all! Here’s how:

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Can you go back?

One of the things Japan is famous for is its fancy toilets. There are ‘washlets’ that wash and dry your nether regions for you, heated toilet seats (take it from me – you should not use these after coming inside from below freezing temperatures like I did once after skiing – you’ll feel like you’ve seared your rump off), and even the delightfully named 音姫 (‘Sound Princess’) which makes a noise to cover up any audible productions of your own in public restrooms.

As it turns out, these ‘super toilets’ may just be the perfect example of the kinds of financial compromises we are willing – and not so willing – to make when it comes to personal comfort.

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What is the meaning of free?

There is a Russian proverb that ‘Only mousetraps have free cheese’ (бесплатный сыр бывает только в мышеловке.) It’s reminiscent of the English saying (though slightly more brutal) ‘There’s no such thing as a free lunch’.

As I sit here digesting one such ‘free lunch’, I must admit, I do feel somewhat like a trapped mouse.

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Where does all my time go?

The relationship between time and money is complex. We talk about ‘saving’ and ‘spending’ both money and time. It’s very tempting to say to ourselves that we could get everything we needed to done if only we had a great expanse of uninterrupted time.

‘I could organise my finances if only I could have one afternoon a week spare, or a whole day to set aside to do my taxes!’
‘I could write that novel if I were rich enough to be holed up in an hotel for a year!’
‘I could learn French if I could live in France for six months!’

What is much harder to see is the amount of time we could be spending, each and every day, on these bigger goals we’d like to achieve.

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Are you worth it?

‘You are in a beauty contest every day of your life’.

A successful advertising slogan, defined as ‘a short and striking or memorable phrase used in advertising’ can exert a powerful influence over us. The importance of a company’s slogan is apparent in their market value. ‘Brands’, which include a company’s name, logo and slogan, are considered extremely valuable corporate assets, and can make up much of a business’s total value – sometimes the brand is more highly prized than its actual products.

Slogans like ‘Maybe she’s born with it. Maybe it’s Maybelline’, ‘You are in a beauty contest every day of your life’, or ‘Because you’re worth it’ are not only memorable, but make a clear association between daily product usage and self worth.

But what exactly is ‘it’ that you are supposedly ‘worth’?

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