Category: Retirement

How can I travel the world on $50 a day?

Figuring out how long you can plan a holiday for, or whether you can afford to travel long-term, is a relatively simple calculation if you have the right variables. In a previous post, I illustrated a few different methods of calculating short, medium, and long term or even permanent travel, but all of them are based on how much you will spend each day.

I mentioned the figure of $50 a day, which for some, might sound entirely unreasonable. That’s how much Paul Terhorst suggested in his book, Cashing in on the American Dream, which is what inspired my husband and I to begin our current travels in large part, and was the impetus behind my most recent post, the first in a series probing the notion of the American Dream. But Terhorst’s book was published back in the 1980s, and the world is, unarguably, different today. One could even say it’s a different world since I wrote my first post in this series on the American Dream two days ago. So is travel on $50 a day still possible?

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How long can I travel for?

Sitting on the bus from Cork to Dublin, I got to thinking about a recent discussion I had with fellow traveller and blogger Elizabeth the Island Enthusiast about the different ways of calculating how long you can travel for – whether for a quick jaunt, extended – or even permanent – travel.

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Why does a shilling bun cost more than a shilling?

Walking past a bakery in Bergen, Norway today, I was consumed by the sweet aroma of hot cinnamon.

In to Baker Brun we went, to buy a Skillingsbolle, described as ‘the all-time favourite Bergen treat’ with a name originating from its original price of one shilling. In fact, the word ‘shilling’ itself derives from the Old Norse scilling meaning ‘division’, and was a division of the old Norwegian Rigsdaler.

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What will you do with your freedom?

What interests you about the concept of freedom? No matter what our money goals, those of us fortunate enough to earn more than is required to satisfy our basic needs are generally aiming for some kind of freedom. Freedom from working as much, or at all, the freedom of your next holiday, of finishing your study, of whatever.

For me, it was the millions of little things.

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How much is enough to be financially independent?

In the last two posts, I asked how much is enough, and what it means to be financially independent.

Now that you know how much you need, and where you sit on the financial independence scale, let’s combine the two: how much is enough to be financially independent? Continue reading “How much is enough to be financially independent?”

Are you financially independent?

Most of us think we’re financially independent when we’re no longer relying on our parents for income. But as employees, we’re still relying on our employers – to stay in business, to keep us employed, to pay us on time.

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How much is enough?

‘How much is enough?’ is something we ask ourselves in relation to lots of things – how much money do we need? How much free time? How much should we eat or drink? These are the sorts of questions I ponder a lot, so it was with great excitement that I encountered Arun Abey and Andrew Ford’s book How Much is Enough.

One of the first reflection questions in the book is ‘How much money is enough? Why? And how do you know?’

This is a question I could not have answered when I first started reading the book over five years ago, but now is one I feel I can do some justice to – ironically, thanks to yet another book.

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Is it time to quit?

Recently, I filled in the shortest form that I ever saw over the course of my career. It was just a single page. And yet it was more difficult to complete than any of the 30+ page forms I’ve filled out before.

It was a resignation form.

Quitting doesn’t come to many of us easily. No one wants to be a ‘quitter’.

The final chapter of Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner’s excellent book Think Like A Freak, following on from their (Super)Freakanomics fame, is aptly titled ‘The upside of quitting’. They identify three important forces that bias us against quitting:

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