Are you your own boss?

‘You’re not the boss of me!’ It’s a common cry you might hear from a child. But as we get older, and go out to work, most of us do end up with someone we call our boss. Almost 90% of American workers work for someone else.

Early last year, I took out a T-shirt I had been waiting to wear for a while. It was one I designed myself.

Across the front, in the largest letters possible, it read ‘CEO of me’.

Continue reading “Are you your own boss?”

Should you sow a seed for prosperity?

‘Invest in me, and God will invest in you’. This is how Tanya Levin characterises the message of those who preach ‘prosperity gospel’, one of a number of closely related teachings also known as abundant life or seed faith. ‘Refuse, and you only have yourself to blame’.

Prosperity gospel or theology is defined as ‘a religious belief among some Christians who hold that financial blessing and physical well-being are always the will of God for them, and that faith, positive speech, and donations to religious causes will increase one’s material wealth’. Although Enrichmentality is not a religious blog, prosperity gospel lies at the intersection of the two topics this site deals with: language (‘positive speech’) and money (‘donations’). The lessons from this example are far reaching.

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Can we end poverty?

Yes, and no. Now we know what it means to be poor, we can talk about what it would take to end poverty.

You may remember that ‘absolute’ poverty is defined ‘in terms of the minimal requirements necessary to afford minimal standards of food, clothing, health care and shelter’. Meanwhile, ‘relative’ poverty is defined ‘relative to others in a country; for example, below 60% of the median income of people in that country.’

One of these can be eradicated, but the other is a different story…

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How does the media affect your money decisions?

Money not only affects the media, but the media can influence our money decisions. Journalists use words such as ‘crisis’ or ‘storm’ to create emotion. This is true of blogs too, with tools like CoSchedule’s headline analyzer encouraging bloggers to use uncommon, powerful, emotional words. (You may be interested to know that analysing the headline for this post, the word ‘money’ counted as an ’emotional’ word).

But how does this influence occur, and what can we do about it? Some more of the presentations at the Money Talks? conference elaborated on this theme. Continue reading “How does the media affect your money decisions?”