Tag: Family

How can I talk about money to people who don’t want to listen?

Last year, I took a long break from posting, in part because I was working on other projects (finishing off my first novel manuscript, yay!). But it was also in part because I felt sick of talking.

Specifically, I was sick of talking about money to people who don’t want to listen.

If you have someone in your life who doesn’t want to hear it when it comes to money (or if you yourself don’t!) read on!

Continue reading “How can I talk about money to people who don’t want to listen?”

How can I save in the holiday season?

It’s the holiday season! The most wonderful time of the year… At least, that’s what I keep telling myself as we watch The Million in this Queensland heat!

But the most wonderful time of the year can involve a lot of waste.

Every year in the UK alone, Cloud Sustainability reports, some 74 million mince pies are thrown away. As are 500 tonnes of Christmas tree lights.

Lining up every Christmas tree bought in a single year in the UK would give you a line the equivalent of a round trip to New York. And, the Guardian reports, enough wrapping paper is thrown away to circle the equator. Not once. Not twice. But nine times. And that is just the UK’s supply.

Yesterday while finishing up some gift shopping, I got to thinking about what the ‘silly season’ means. And, how we can avoid waste, save, and enjoy the holiday season.

Enrichmentality now has a wealth of posts – 130 in total. So I thought, what better time than the end of the year to delve into some of them?

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Should you pay for two tickets?

Should you have to pay extra to bring your baby on a plane, or to a concert? Should an overweight person have to pay for two tickets? Or should an underweight person get an additional baggage allowance on their flight? Should students have to give up their seats to seniors when they’re both getting cut-price tickets? Continue reading “Should you pay for two tickets?”

Should I rely on the Bank of Mum and Dad? / Should I lend money to my kids?

A worrying new report names the so-called ‘Bank of Mum and Dad’ as Australia’s 5th largest lender. This ‘Bank’ – Aussie parents – have collectively lent their sons and daughters more than a whopping $65 billion dollars. Almost a third of parents now help their kids buy a home. The average amount ‘lent’ is $64,000. Why the scare quotes around ‘lent’? Because in two-thirds of cases, Mum and Dad don’t expect to be repaid. (In my book, that’s called a gift, not a loan).

But should you rely on the Bank of Mum and Dad? And, Mums and Dads – should you lend to your kids?

This post – a bumper issue that is the first to tackle two questions – is not only for those considering lending money within families, but also for those who have or will buy a home without family support.
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Are you writing your own script?

You may not realise it, but you are a script writer.

Every day, you are writing the script of your life. And just like in the movies, what you write into the script today will influence the eventual outcome of the story.

As Susan David writes in ‘Emotional Agility’, ‘We may not drive convertibles past palm trees or take meetings with movie stars, but each of us, in our own way, is a Hollywood screenwriter. That’s because, every minute of every day, we’re writing the scripts that get screened at the cinema inside our heads.’

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How much should you spend on an engagement ring?

As Australians vote on marriage equality, and the phrase ‘diamonds are forever’ marks its 60th anniversary, I thought it appropriate  to ask how much you should spend on an engagement ring.

One usual answer is “three months’ salary”. Sometimes you may hear “as much as you can afford”. There are even (extremely depressing) calculators to “help” hopeful fiances to calculate an appropriate figure.

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, however, you’ll realise “how much should you spend on an engagement ring?” is of course a trick question.

But it is one that is interesting for us all -of any gender, sex, sexual identity, or marital status – to consider.

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Are you your own boss?

‘You’re not the boss of me!’ It’s a common cry you might hear from a child. But as we get older, and go out to work, most of us do end up with someone we call our boss. Almost 90% of American workers work for someone else.

Early last year, I took out a T-shirt I had been waiting to wear for a while. It was one I designed myself.

Across the front, in the largest letters possible, it read ‘CEO of me’.

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Where should kids learn about money?

Like language, money is a symbolic system we use to communicate with each other. Kids’ exposure and sensitivity to language begins early, and the same may be true of money. The majority of opinions agree financial education ‘begins with children – the younger the better’. In the last post, we looked at what an important role financial education and family background has in influencing outcomes in life.

But where do – and where should – kids learn about money?

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How can I save with menu planning?

Having just returned from the shops with boxes full of melomakarona (μελομακάρονα, a dessert made of flour, olive oil and honey) and kourabiedes (κουραμπιέδες, a butter shortbread dipped in rosewater and powdered sugar) in preparation for Christmas in Greece, food is on my mind!

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Can you enjoy Christmas without worsening debt? | Guest post

The holidays season should be a time of joy and togetherness, not financial stress, but it is also the time of year that, more than any other, we hear those messages to ‘buy, buy, buy‘. With pressure from not only the media but social expectations  – at work, among family and friends – it can be hard to remain focused on not only the real spirit of the season, but our financial goals.

According to some sources, almost two-thirds of shoppers do not save anything for their holiday spending, and around a third finance the holiday entirely on credit card.

Continue reading “Can you enjoy Christmas without worsening debt? | Guest post”